Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12136/458
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Title: The first evidence of cut marks and usewear traces from the Plio-Pleistocene locality of El-Kherba (Ain Hanech), Algeria: implications for early hominin subsistence activities circa 1.8 Ma
Authors: Sahnouni, Mohamed
Rosell, Jordi
Made, Jan van der
Vergès Bosch, Josep María
Ollé Cañellas, Andreu
Kandi, Nadia
Harichane, Zoheir
Derradji, Abdelkader
Medig, Mohamed
Keywords: Fauna;Early Paleolithic;Oldowan
Issue Date: Feb-2013
Publisher: Elsevier
Citation: Journal of Human Evolution, 2013, 64 (2), 137-150
Abstract: The current archaeological data on early hominin subsistence activities in Africa are derived chiefly from Sub-Saharan Plio-Pleistocene sites. The recent studies at El-Kherba (Ain Hanech) in northeastern Algeria expand the geographic range of evidence of hominin subsistence patterns to include the earliest known archaeological sites documented in North Africa. Dated to 1.78 million years ago (Ma), excavations from El-Kherba yielded an Oldowan industry associated with a savanna-like fauna contained in floodplain deposits. The faunal assemblage is dominated by large and medium-sized animals (mainly adults), especially equids, which are represented by at least 11 individuals. The mammalian archaeofauna preserves numerous cut-marked and hammerstone-percussed bones. Made of primarily limestone and flint, the stone assemblage consists of core forms, débitage, and retouched pieces. Evidence of usewear traces is found on several of the flint artifacts, indicating meat processing by early hominins. Overall, our subsistence analysis indicates that early hominins were largely responsible for bone modification at the site, which is also corroborated by other relevant taphonomic evidence. Moreover, at 1.78 Ma, the cutmarked bones recovered from El-Kherba represent the earliest known evidence for ancestral hominin butchery activities and large animal foraging capabilities in northern Africa.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12136/458
ISSN: 0047-2484
1095-8606
DOI: 10.1016/j.jhevol.2012.10.007
metadata.dc.relation.publisherversion: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhevol.2012.10.007
Type: Article
Appears in Collections:Arqueología



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