Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12136/2291
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Title: Early hominin subsistence activities: the First archaeological evidence (with cutmarks) from the Plio-Pleistocene localities of Ain Hanech and El-Kherba (1.78 Ma), Algeria
Authors: Sahnouni, Mohamed
Rosell, Jordi
Made, Jan van der
Vergès Bosch, Josep María
Ollé Cañellas, Andreu
Derradji, Abdelkader
Harichane, Zoheir
Kandi, Nadia
Issue Date: 2008
Publisher: American Association of Physical Anthropologists
Citation: Annual Meeting of the Paleoanthropology Society, 2008, p. 21
Abstract: The current archaeological data on early hominin subsistence activities in Africa is derived chiefly from Sub‐Saharan Plio‐Pleistocene sites, such as Bouri, Gona (Ethiopia); FLK Zinj, BK site (Tanzania); FxJj50 (Kenya); and Sterkfontein Member 5, Swartkrans Member 3 (South Africa). The recent studies at Ain Hanech and El‐Kherba in northeastern Algeria have broadened the range of Plio‐Pleistocene hominin subsistence activities to North Africa. Dated to 1.78 million years ago, Ain Hanech and El‐Kherba yielded an Oldowan industry associated with a savanna‐like fauna contained in floodplain deposits, including elephants, hippo, rhino, equids, bovids, girafid, suids, and carnivores. The faunal assemblages are dominated by large and medium‐sized adult animals, especially equids with at least 10 individuals. The mammalian archaeofauna preserves numerous cutmarked and hammerstone‐percussed bones. Made of limestone and flint, the stone assemblages consisted of core forms, debitage, and retouched pieces, and represent a North African variant of the Oldowan Industrial Complex. Evidence of microwear is found on several flint artifacts, indicating their use by early hominins in meat processing. Overall, our subsistence analysis indicates that early hominins were largely responsible for the site accumulation, which also is corroborated by other relevant taphonomic evidence. Moreover, this finding documents for the first time evidence of early hominin large animal foraging capabilities in northern Africa during the Early Pleistocene.
Description: Ponencia presentada en: Annual Meeting of the Paleoanthropology Society, 25-26 de marzo 2008, Vancouver, Canada
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12136/2291
Editor version: https://paleoanthro.org/meetings/
Type: Presentation
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Appears in Collections:Congresos, encuentros científicos y estancias de investigación

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