Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12136/1640
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dc.contributor.authorJia, Zhenxiu-
dc.contributor.authorPei, Shuwen-
dc.contributor.authorBenito-Calvo, Alfonso-
dc.contributor.authorMa, Dongdong-
dc.contributor.authorSánchez-Romero, Laura-
dc.contributor.authorWei, Qi-
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-08T15:54:54Z-
dc.date.issued2019-11-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Quaternary Science, 2019, 34 (8), 621-632es_ES
dc.identifier.issn0267-8179-
dc.identifier.issn1099-1417-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12136/1640-
dc.description.abstractUnderstanding site formation processes is crucial for interpreting archaeological context patterns and hominin behaviour as these affect the preserved condition of a site and the integrity of archaeological remains. The fluvio‐lacustrine sequences in the Nihewan Basin of North China are rich sources of early Pleistocene archaeological sites, which offer an important opportunity to investigate human evolution and adapted behaviours in East Asia. Although many Palaeolithic sites have been reported from the Nihewan Basin, North China, few of them focus on site formation processes before interpreting the hominin behaviour patterns. Here, we present a site formation study of four archaeological layers (Layers 6D, 6C, 6B and 6A) in Trench 1 from the Donggutuo (namely DGT‐T1) site in the Nihewan Basin with an age of 1.1 Ma. Through the study of sedimentary contexts, spatial distributions of artefacts and fossils, intra‐assemblage category ratios, debitage size distributions, lithic abrasion, artifact orientation and planar dip, our results show that all the layers had been disturbed by low‐energy sheet wash across the lake shore setting, but to differing extents. The post‐depositional disturbance caused by water decreased from the lower to the upper layers, from Layer 6D to Layer 6A. This indicates that the archaeological remains in DGT‐T1 have not been subject to significant natural modifications and are thus suitable for studying early hominin behaviour in North China.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipERC‐Advanced Grant. Grant Number: 832980; National Natural Science Foundation of China. Grant Numbers: 41372032, 41872029; the Strategic Priority Research Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences. Grant Number: XDB26000000; John Templeton Foundation through a grant to the Stone Age Institute; the UCAS Joint PhD Training Program.es_ES
dc.language.isoenes_ES
dc.publisherWileyes_ES
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/restrictedAccesses_ES
dc.subjectDonggutuo (DGT) sitees_ES
dc.subjectEarly Pleistocenees_ES
dc.subjectNihewan basines_ES
dc.subjectSite formation processes_ES
dc.titleSite formation processes at Donggutuo: a major Early Pleistocene site in the Nihewan basin, North Chinaes_ES
dc.typeArticlees_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/jqs.3151-
dc.relation.publisherversionhttps://doi.org/10.1002/jqs.3151es_ES
dc.date.available2020-01-08T15:54:54Z-
Appears in Collections:Geocronología y Geología



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