Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://cir.cenieh.es/handle/20.500.12136/3025
Title: The gut microbiome mediates adaptation to scarce food in Coleoptera
Authors: Moldovan, Oana Teodora
Carrell, Alyssa A.
Bulzu, Paul Adrian
Levei, Erika
Bucur, Ruxandra
Sitar, Cristian
Faur, Luchiana
Cornel Mirea, Ionuț
Senilă, Marin
Cadar, Oana
Podar, Mircea
Keywords: Cave beetles;Carpathians;Gut microbiome;Sediments;Adaptation
Issue Date: 2023
Publisher: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
Citation: BioRxiv, 2023 [Preprint]
Abstract: Beetles are ubiquitous cave invertebrates worldwide that adapted to scarce subterranean resources when they colonized caves. Here, we investigated the potential role of gut microbiota in the adaptation of beetles to caves from different climatic regions of the Carpathians. The beetles’ microbiota was host-specific, reflecting phylogenetic and nutritional adaptation. The microbial community structure further resolved conspecific beetles by caves suggesting microbiota-host coevolution and influences by local environmental factors. The detritivore species hosted a variety of bacteria known to decompose and ferment organic matter, suggesting turnover and host cooperative digestion of the sedimentary microbiota and allochthonous-derived nutrients. The cave Carabidae, with strong mandibulae adapted to predation and scavenging of animal and plant remains, had distinct microbiota dominated by symbiotic lineages Spiroplasma or Wolbachia. All beetles had relatively high levels of fermentative Carnobacterium and Vagococcus involved in lipid accumulation and a reduction of metabolic activity, and both features characterize adaptation to caves.
URI: https://cir.cenieh.es/handle/20.500.12136/3025
DOI: 10.1101/2023.05.12.540564
Editor version: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.05.12.540564
Type: Preprint
Appears in Collections:Geocronología y Geología

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